Welcome

Welcome

Have you ever wondered why you keep relapsing? Tired of bouncing in and out of recovery? Finally, you have come home to a real solution: Prana Recovery Centers, where real life meets recovery. Prana Recovery Centers approaches the problem of alcohol and drug dependency with a fresh perspective, backed by scientific research, combined with ancient wisdom, and focused on relapse prevention. We provide a revolutionary relapse prevention program that integrates contemporary science with traditional wisdom.

Believe in your Recovery

 

The Family Matters Program

The loved ones of addicts and alcoholics suffer too. Many are seeking solutions that help the addict or alcoholic without over helping and thereby actually hurting. They want solutions to the problems without disconnecting from their loved ones. PRC’s Family Matters is available to those family members and/or loved ones that would like to find support, skills, and practical solutions to the complexities of living with addiction.

The Yoga of Addiction Recovery

At first brush, you would think that AA and yoga have absolutely nothing in common. AA began in the 1930’s as a program with 12 steps to overcome the downward spiral of alcoholism. Yoga is an ancient physical, mental, and spiritual practice that originated in India thousands of years ago. What could these two seemingly disparate disciplines have in common? Oh, just everything. The spiritual quest is a major component of both AA and Yoga, and both detail the path for experiencing and maintaining a new spiritual consciousness. This spiritual connection is a necessary component for relapse prevention from alcohol and drug abuse. It is also available to those who want it; fortunately, we do not have to be gurus, monks, or even good enough. It is about the seeking not the finding.

The Spiritual Quest

AA and yoga are at their core are spiritual endeavors. Both systems, if you will, provide specific and concrete methods for engaging the spirit that lives within us. One of the main purposes of AA is to help members have “deep and effective spiritual experiences which have revolutionized our whole attitude toward life, toward our fellows, and toward God’s universe.” (Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book Page 25, 3rd Edition) The results of living the twelve steps is living a spiritual quest that allows us to be happily clean and sober. The word Yoga means “yoke” or union. The goal of yoga (not just the postures but all of Yoga – see below) is meaningful spiritual insight. One of the limbs of yoga is a deep meditative state called Samadhi that means union with the divine. Samadhi is the eighth limb of the yogic path. It is the realization of our oneness with Spirit. AA & Yoga focus on the path on how to realize to a spiritual experience that results in less suffering for you and those around you. With less suffering, we are less likely to find it necessary to chose a drink or a drug to cope.

Silhouette of woman standing at yoga pose on the beach during amazing sunset.

The Path to Get There

Both AA and Yoga also have a clearly delineated path for obtaining this new spiritual connection. Most of us have heard at least something about the twelve steps of AA. By doing the steps as outlined in the first 103 pages of AA’s Big Book we are promised a spiritual experience and a new found “God-Consciousness.” The 12 steps are:

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Yoga has eight limbs that support spiritual development and end with the eighth limb mentioned above, Samadhi, which is the ultimate divine connection. The eight limbs are:

  1. Yama :  Universal morality/moral restraints
  2. Niyama :  Personal observances & practices
  3. Asanas :  Body postures
  4. Pranayama :  Mindful breathing; breathing exercises
  5. Pratyahara :  Turning inward
  6. Dharana :  Concentration; cultivating inner perceptual awareness
  7. Dhyana :   Meditation
  8. Samadhi :  Union with Spirit

These road maps to a spiritual experience provide a practical application for seeing, feeling, and being rid of that which keeps us stuck in patterns of behavior that no longer serve us. These are the patterns of behavior that cause us to relapse.

Service to Others is the Spiritual Glue

AA and Yoga have service to others as the tool to maintain our new spiritual condition. The Big Book of AA outlines the necessary activities for maintaining spiritual fitness in steps ten through twelve which are known as the “maintenance” steps. Working with others to help them find a spiritual solution to all their problems is a major tenet of step twelve. An entire chapter in the Big Book, Chapter 7, Working With Others, is devoted to carrying the AA message and making service work a spiritual activity. Yoga has two important concepts to support and maintain spiritual transformation. Karma yoga is virtuous action and Seva is selfless service. Both require the practitioner to give up his or her needs to satisfy the needs of others. In the ultimate, think Mahatama Gandhi, Mother Theresa, Jesus, Buddha and others. We do not have to be Saints to experience a spiritual transformation; in fact, we do not even have to be good! Making any type of change to limit selfishness and self-centeredness and turning our attention to helping others is actually an act of Yoga. It can be as simple as being kind when checking out at a store with a slow cashier, being considerate when irritated while driving, or instead of arguing just not saying anything rather than adding fuel to a spark that wants to become an inferno. Spiritual practice is when we are kind, patience, compassionate, loving, tolerant, and all the qualities that are good and right with us humans. In this realm, how we are being is the same as how we are doing. Then we experience the peace, contentment, and serenity that come from being free from the living hell of addiction.

It is essential to find a path – effective practices with practical application to everyday life – to combat the cravings and mental obsessions of addiction. The twelve steps of AA and Yoga are excellent relapse prevention tools in the spiritual toolbox of alcoholics and drug addicts. When practiced together they create a very strong defense against relapse.

Sources:

Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous

The Bhagavad Gita (Easwaran)

The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (Sri Swami Satchidananda)

Meditations from the Mat (Rolf Gates)

Rewiring

Rewiring

Contemporary social science research has shown that it is possible to rewire the brain to create new patterns of behavior and improve well-being.

Neuroscience research consistently indicates that the use of mindfulness can rewire one’s brain for wellness. Many studies link meditation to positive brain structure changes that improve emotional control including feeling less anger. In fact, mindfulness has become one of the most studied interventions with positive results that indicate it reduces anxiety, improves over all well being, and an increased ability to behavior in a way that is consistent with positive outcomes.

Prana Recovery Centers (PRC) is committed to bringing contemporary science to the newly sober addict and alcoholic. We even take it one step further and commit to providing these cutting edge interventions at low or no cost to those in recovery who are determined to live clean and sober. This commitment comes from direct experience of the benefits of mindfulness practice as a tremendously effective support to long term sobriety and happily living clean and sober.

Our vision is that one day there will be PRC Learning Labs that will provide EEG brain scanning and state of the art signal processing so each resident will have immediate real-time neuro-feedback tracking the progress of rewiring for positive wellbeing.

Resiliency

Resiliency

The ability to bounce back from the inevitable low spots of living without picking up a drink or a drug is achievable through specific habits of mind, body & spirit. Prana Recovery Centers Relapse Prevention Program participants practice activities and exercises that create sustainable skills including the science of happiness, yoga, exercise, and nutrition for staying clean and sober through the ups & downs of life.

Did you know that you have a set point for happiness that corresponds to approximately 50% of your happiness level?  More importantly, you have control over the remaining approximately 50% of your happiness through deliberate and intentional behaviors, thoughts, and actions. The science of happiness explores the ingredients of happiness and a meaningful life.  A lot of research has been done to investigate the effects of practicing gratitude, compassion, empathy, forgiveness, and happiness. The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California – Berkeley is an excellent source of information.resilience-inspirational-quote

The practice of yoga is thousands of years old.  It is a whole lot more than the postures we are familiar with through yoga studios and the media.  The system of yoga actually has eight limbs – or practices – that promote well-being and ultimately a spiritual way of life.  The eight limbs are:

  1. Yama :  Universal morality/moral restraints
  2. Niyama :  Personal observances & practices
  3. Asanas :  Body postures
  4. Pranayama :  Mindful breathing; breathing exercises
  5. Pratyahara :  Turning inward
  6. Dharana :  Concentration; cultivating inner perceptual awareness
  7. Dhyana :   Meditation
  8. Samadhi :  Union with Spirit

Yoga has been studied extensively as a mechanism for positive transformational growth spiritually, physically, mentally, & emotionally.  This 2014 study focuses on the impact of yoga practice on self-regulation using the brain’s networks. Having the ability to self-regulate, which means being able to control one’s emotions, thoughts, and behaviors to meet the demands of the situation to achieve goal-directed outcomes, is essential for achieving long-term sobriety.  In other words, when someone with a drug or alcohol dependency is in a difficult spot, he or she must be skilled in monitoring their own internal environment (mental and emotional states) in order to take the necessary steps to prevent relapse. Kripalu’s  Institute for Extraordinary Living offers a significant amount of research regarding the effectiveness of yoga practice on well being.

Other supporting practices for being resilient and maintaining sobriety are exercise & nutrition.  Being skillful and balanced in both areas becomes a primary support for happily living clean & sober and achieving long-term sobriety.

Prana Recovery Centers engages participants in their own exploration and healing to find out which supports resonant with each individual.  The holistic approach utilized emphasizes that there is no one “right” model for staying clean & sober. Each participant is given the opportunity and support to discover the practices that he or she would like to learn and experience in order to avoid relapse.

 

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